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and how sweden's top company plans to grow in the united states. britain's's pan european disclosed discussing a union to create a 93 billion dollar titan that would be the world's largest aerospace and defense company. deal if approved by global regulators would join europe's leading military and aerospace contractors into a new giant that builds commercial cargo fighter trainer aircraft helicopters and rockets and saturdayel lights missiles and radars and other sophisticated electronics communication systems and security products. the companys proprosed the -- proposed complex ownership ada holding 68% and bae40%. to alie security concerns executives have promised to operate bae's vast operation independently of the new parent. what does the deal mean globally what's next and what will government regulators be focusing on. join us is stev. grundman who analyzes and reviewed defense mergers and acquisition at the pentagon during the clinton administration and he advices defense and aerospace companies worldwide and has absolutely no stake in this particular transaction. >> no. righ
, with shepard smith. >>shepard: breaking news in the coordinated attack on the united states consulate in libya and murder of the united states ambassador on 9/11. there is no apparent to it. he was absolutely murdered. lib al-libi -- libyan officials made an arrest. no one will confirm the information. u.s. officials tell fox to be "cautious," about reports of arrests. according to reuters, quoting libya's interior minister four men are in custody and under investigation suspected of helping events at the u.s. consulate. "helping." f.b.i. and others are on the ground in the early stages of the investigation. top priority here? find out whether the strike on the consulate was a planned assault by terrorists rather than a rampageing mob angry other antimuslim video. catherine is in washington, dc, first on the reported arrests. >> this afternoon, the intelligence community is trying to knock down the report. this question was put to the state department. i saw the press reports before i came down. i was not able to confirm them. obviously, it would be a good thing if we are moving forward on thi
in the united states and said to be insulting to islam. >>> u.s. drones join the manhunt for those who killed a u.s. diplomat and three other americans. concerns over the tep id response by the new regime in egypt. >> i don't think that we would consider them an ally, but we don't consider them an enemy. >> we're covering every angle of this developing story. first, let's take a step back and look at how things have unfolded over the past 48 hours. the outrage first ignited tuesday in egypt. protesters converged on the embassy. within hours, crowds gathered outside benghazi, libya. armed militants killed the u.s. ambassador and three of the staffers. today, crowds storm the u.s. embassy in yemen. riot police eventually turned them back with tear gas. also today, demonstrators turn out in iran. they aamass outside the swiss embassy, which represents u.s. interests in iran. let's get the latest now from that region. mohammed jamjoon join us. >> about 2,000 to 3,000 protesters that were marching toward the u.s. embassy, many of them aable to get close enough to the main gates. they started scali
. >> the cruel irony here is that the united states is well-regarded in libya. and there's a moderate government in place. and this is clearly the actions of an isolated and very small but very vicious terrorist group. and so we've got to protect ourselves from those groups. and we've got to go after them. >> reporter: and, wolf, as i said, we're expecting momentarily a briefing background here at the state department. there are a lot of details. everyone that we talk to says that it was a very, very complex almost chaotic situation. fighting on the outside. fire on the inside. and so we expect to have more details as we go along. >> and so far we've only been told the names of chris stephens and sean smith. the other two they have not released their names yet, is that right? >> yes. they were security officials. >> not u.s. marines though? >> reporter: no. we understand were not marines. they were security personnel. >> let us know what happens at this background briefing you're about to get. and you'll update our viewers. standby for that. jill dougherty. let's go to nic robertson now in londo
there simply as a diversion. four americans died including the united states ambassador to libya chris stevens. our foreign affairs correspondent, jill dougherty, has been working her sources to get a better idea on exactly what happened. our senior international correspondent nic robertson is monitoring the search for who's responsible. and our pentagon correspondent chris lawrence is keeping tabs on the u.s. military's response to what's going on as well. let's go to jill first. she's watching what's going on. jill, what's the latest over at the state department beyond the heartbreak of a top u.s. diplomat, three others killed? >> right, wolf. just in a few minutes we're expecting an update, a briefing on background by senior officials here at the state department. but for now this is what we know based on the conversations and what we are hearing from u.s. officials. tuesday night at the u.s. consulate in benghazi, a complex and highly dangerous situation. outside an anti-american protest. then a group of heavily armed militants, approximately two dozen of them, launched an attack firing ro
leaders are leading the reform process. united states is committed to protecting the space for civil society to operate and the critical role plays in transitioning democracy all over the world. with a greater emphasis on a broader range of u.s. power, president obama succeeded in laying a new foundation for leadership in the world. nowhere do you see this more clearly than the commitment to the area that you focus on for the remainder of my remarks, the development in poverty and prosperity. the presiden was unapologetic, putting to rest the old myth that development is near charity. rejecting the notion that they were condemned by the gains in human developments. as such, the national security strategy recognizes development in the moral, strategic, and economic imperatives. on that day he announced the new u.s. global development policy. the premise is on the conviction that the ultimate goal of foreign assistance and development is to create the conditions with the assistance are no longer needed. focusing on helping these broad base -- is broadbased economic growth, prioritizing
be a movement for the united states to withdraw to fortress america, to renounce our -- our -- our service to the world in helping these countries achieve the same democracy and freedom that our forefathers strived for? i do not mean to use his death as any kind of political agenda, but i think my friend and i remember him well enough to know that the worst outcome of this tragedy wod be for the united states to withdraw. in fact, i am confident that if he were here, he would be urging us to get right back in, get -- bring these extremists to justice and press on with the democracy and freedom that the people of libya deserve and have earned at great loss of blood and treasure. mr. lieberman: mr. president, i couldn't agree more with my friend from arizona. it would -- it would really dishonor the service of chris stevens and the three other americans who served us in libya if their murders by these extremists led us to retrench and pull out of libya and stop supporting the new libyan government, democratically elecd, pull out of other parts of the arab world. that would be exactly the opp
way? what constitutes the wrong way? here in united states and in the middle east there is enormous debate over how to handle iran's pursuit of a nuclear enrichment capability, a capability which would give iran the ability to manufacture nuclear weapons if they chose to do so. and obvious a this is an issue that's been with us for a very long time. i remember i first encountered it in immediate aftermath of the gulf war in 1991 when israel purchased 25 longer-range f-15 e. strike fighters. and those fighters were designated not f-15 e., but f-15-i. and the manufacture said that the i was for israel. if you spoke to israeli air force pilots and commanders, what the uniform would say to you is now now now that i is for iraq. this is an issue, this is a problem, it is a threat that the israelis have been thinking about for a very long time. they has been a great deal of effort trying to figure out how to develop a military option to disarm iran, to destroy its nuclear program if they ever chose to do so. and they've been working very deciduous lead at the. but by the same token, you w
steer america towards a fiscal cliff. we have voted 65 days this year in the united states senate. there are a number of things. you raise the one about the payroll tax cut, we haven't passed an appropriations bill this year. why is that? harry reid laid it out earlier in "the national journal." forget passing bills, the democrats want to pass the blame game. i see this. we haven't figured out if they are going to pay doctors next year. 30% cut. the president says he has extended the life of medicare, only if he lowers what they pay doctors who take care of doctors 30% and freezes that for the next 10 years. for somebody on medicare, they will have a difficult time finding a doctor to take care of them. host: it appears something fleeds to be done. your payroll tax conferee last year agreed to extend the payroll tax cut holiday for another year. are you in favor of doing so again? guest: i voted against the conference committee report. i don't think it's going to be extended this year. we are looking at tax rates going up. death tax coming back in a much more onerous way. there is
they hear that the president of the united states is no longer necessarily categorically calling egypt an ally? >> reporter: well, you know, quite honestly there's been a lot of confusion about what the u.s. role is right now and how the u.s. feels about egypt. before our revolution began, there was and continued to be a lot of anti-u.s. sentiment because of this support by various u.s. administrations for dictators in this region. but hearing the statement today, i think people are thinking, all right, well, whose side are you on because we're trying to get this revolution working and it has definitely confused a lot of people. >> all right, thank you so much for your time. i want to go directly to golden, colorado, where the president is speaking about the four who were killed in libya. >> serve in difficult and dangerous places all around the world, to advance the interests and the values that we hold dear as americans. and a lot of times their work goes unheralded, it doesn't get a lot of attention. but it is vitally important. we enjoy our security and our liberty because of the s
rising home prices. all these are more important to the united states than what's going on in europe. >> mark, how do you see it? you invested in europe these days or no? >> a little bit, maria. you know, i guess the thing i would say about europe and soon to watch on our shores is you're going to pay more and get less. i look forward to the dislocation between price and value. i think there are a few opportunities in europe selectively. a company we own called securitas, which is a man-guarded service. it trades for about 50 krona. we think it's worth 72. we get about a 6% dividend yield. there's an example where you can find opportunity. >> everybody's looking for yield in an environment where we can't find any. rick, what are you seeing there today? >> you had a great point. everybody's looking for yields, so everybody needs to take more risk. that's the plan. the problem is, when you take more risk to get more reward, you have more risk. you know, take the word austerity and throw it out. use the word reform. one guest just said central bankers are doing all the heavy lifting. be
, the next step is to ask the united states military, will they and can they provide protection and to get -- request permission from the host government to allow them to come in, the u.s. forces, solely to protect the perimeter of the scene and the investigators while they are there. and best we can tell, we don't know if that's ever happened. >> so does it make sense to you, the claim that security is the concern for why fbi agents aren't on the ground? >> it doesn't make sense to me because i understand that there are procedures in place to try and mitigate against those risks and concerns and ways to deal with it. >> procedures that 16 days on, you would think could be in place. >> yes. exactly. >> bob, you have been talking to sources at the pentagon. you say the u.s. is really at a standoff here. how so? >> it's in a standoff, anderson, because the fbi and the military have decided they have to go in with extra protection. the military wanted to send in a special package which would have included counter battery because remember, the annex was attacked by mortars. this was a military
. the united states drew a clear, red line. iran backed off. different lines can be drawn in the i iranian nuclear program. but to be credible, a line must be drawn first and foremost in one vital part of their program -- on their efforts to enrich uranium. let me explain why. any bomb consists of an explosive material and a mechanism to ignite it. the simplest example is fuse.der in and a you light the fuse and set off the gunpowder. the gunpowder is enriched uranium in regards to iran's nuclear program. the fuse is a detonator. for iran, amassing enough uranium is far more difficult than producing a nuclear fuse. for a country like iran, it takes many, many years to enrich uranium for a bomb. that requires thousands of center fuses spinning in tandem in big industrial plants. those are green plants are visible. they are still vulnerable. in contrast, iran could produce a record detonator, the fuse, in a lot less time. maybe under a year. maybe only a few months. the detonator can be made in a small workshop the size of the classroom. it might be difficult to find and target that workshop
action to put our fiscal health in order and obviously that is a bigger challenge in the united states were adding a trillion dollars in debt year after year -- though how does it unplayed? >> that could serve as a source of entertainment to the canadian community. >> how do you think the u.s. does play out? >> i think that is a big risk and the frustrating thing in the u.s. is that the core is so strong and so good. you know we have illegal immigration by the way the average -- no growth over five years which includes a downturn but basically it's a big economy in 2% on a big economy as a big number and i think it goes. but it's very -- these problems are self-inflicted to a great extent and it makes it all the more frustrating and it must be frustrating to watch last summer with the debt ceiling and save why don't you compromise and why don't you get this done? i would say it's sometimes more frustrating to watch something that you can undo. it's like seeing it spiraling and you wish you could stop it and is within everybody's power to stop it. i think it's a political system to some
american forces like we had not seen in years. one of the first mobilizations was our united states military. and they were called to serve bravely in remote corners of the global. 11 years later the mastermind of 9/11, osama bin laden, was taken down, and we now have an al qaeda that is severely diminished, and we are bringing our troops home from that part of the world. but, mr. president, for the troops when they come home, the fight is not over. there's another fight when they get back home to america. it's a different type of battle. the unemployment rate among veterans returning from iraq and afghanistan was just under 11% in august. it's higher for those who are younger, and this problem is likely to continue to grow as we draw down in afghanistan, just like we've already drawn down in iraq. it's worth noting that there have been steps made in the right direction. this past summer we passed legislation that'll help veterans get federal occupational licenses when their military training matches the civilian requirements. that was a bill that i had the privilege of sponsoring.
. the united states of america with their two presence in afghanistan with peace and stability, then you are personally the national interest of pakistan because the known and unknown objective of pakistan within the region is also peace and stability. why talk about the regional approach is to give you confidence for your buck the talk of first doing that. that she must not look at us, but she must look at us from the lens have today in the toasty today the future that pakistan wants for itself as that of peace and stability in. and we have a peaceful, stable region, everything else will work great. so is a march on i think we need to send each other messages. one of the means is to send that message out, that we are keen to work together to ensure that in afghanistan we are able to achieve together long sustainable fees, less admitted that we are not able to achieve. so let's work together. this put our energies together, our resources together. let's not blame each other. let's find time to sit together to work through this together because as i said, this is something that in this re
is flying at half staff. ladies and gentlemen, the national anthem of the united states. [playing "the star-spangled benneranner"] >> ladies and gentleman, the united states army chief of chaplain, major general. >> let us pray. remember the events of september 11, 2001. pray for all of those who greek today. for those who witnessed and survived the attack -- pray for all of those who grieve today. for those who witnessed and survived the attack, on a day when the worst visited our nation, our spirits were inspired what we saw at grand 0 and at the pentagon. we pray for the men and women who have been called to defend our country both at home and abroad. inspired by their legacy, we ask for continued courage and strength in spirit to faithfully serve our military and our nation. we are thankful that in our time of loss, you have not abandoned us to our grief. help us so that we may do your work, peace and justice, offering forgiveness and building community. hear us, lord god, in your holy name we pray. amen. >> a mamen. >> 11 years ago, the pentagon was attacked. please join us in obs
] in the united states senate. still fighting for those who count on him to be their voice. using his intellect and his he will consequence he has fought to improve our health care choices and to protect our environment. and he called attention to the threat of terrorism before september 11. [applause] you know, i married the smartest, toughest, sweetest man i know. and in two days we will celebrate 27 years of marriage. [cheers and applause] the way we always do. we'll do it the way we always do, at wendy's. [laughter] whether it's wendy's or washington, i found that it's true. it's not where you go, it's who you go with. [cheers and applause] but none of the things i've mentioned are the reasons i married john edwards. i married him because he was the single most optimistic person that i have ever known. he knew there was a brighter day ahead even as he swept the floors in the cotton mill as a high school student. he knew if he worked hard enough, he could be the first in his family to go to college. he knew that he could outwork and outtough any battalion of lawyers to find justice. and he c
generation face nothing comparable to that of lawmakers in the mid-19th mid-19th century as the united states was on the bring of breaking apart, and the book that we're about to hear about, america's great debate,tles the story of the compromise of 1850, which helped to resolve at least for a while, the conflict over how to bring the vast mexican territory into the united states. the reviewer who did this review for the washington post happened to be don graham, the chairman of the washington post company, who is a student of history. he called this book original in concept and stylish in execution. the compromise that mr. bordewich will tell us about resulted from some of the most creative legislating that the country has ever seen, although mr. bordewich will be quick to point out that the compromise was also deeply flawed. but it did prevent an earlier breakup of the union. this is also a story that includes a magnificent cast of characters. befitting the epic struggles that played out during the course of the great debate. this is the third work be fergus bordewich which explores how sla
on american aircraft over the united states. i don't think that's going -- nothing's going to stop that happening. >> reporter: the u.s. government is not even considering allowing passengers to use cell phones on planes. but officials are looking into whether passengers can use devices like these to read or listen to music during takeoff and landing. american airlines pilots just started using ipads in the cockpit throughout the flight to access maps and other information. flight attendants will also get tablets to use inside the cabin. and consumer advocates say allowing passengers to do the same during takeoff and landing would only be fair. >> it kind of bothers consumers and passengers not so much the fact that they can't make cell phone calls, just the fact they can't use any electronic devices. >> reporter: and he worries one day on domestic u.s. flights dealing with a loud neighbor talking on a mobile phone may be the next in-flight inconvenience. sandra endo, cnn, washington. >> polls show mitt romney's support is lagging in key states. we'll talk with newt gingrich about
with protecting the united states in particular. the obama administration changed our plans for european missile defense to leverage the existing missile defense system and put that system sure first in romania and poland later on. they also curtailed the ground-based midcourse. they stopped it at 30. i think the wrong administration would actually probably go back and change the balance again, much more in favor of national missile defense systems and we have actually seen in congress, republicans have been pushing the idea of deploying some of these ground-based and interceptors on the united states disclosed. another area of specific differences in shipbuilding. it is an imperfect measure, but the total number of ships in the navy -- it actually reached a low point at 279 ships, i should say. that was in the bush administration in 2007. we have come up since then i think we were about 280 ships right now. the obama administration plans to bring the shift count up to about 300. the goal is still 313. but if you look over 830 year shipbuilding plan, and averages over 30 years. so if we graduall
for making mitt romney the next president of the united states. we have got a job to do, friends. and you know what? we have a lot of people who need jobs. and we have a big choice ahead of us. the question is, are we going to stick with four more years of the same? the same path? no. are we going to have a country in debt, doubt, and decline? or are we going to do what we need to do to get people back to work, to fix the mess in washington, and to get this country back on the right track. [applause] we want to earn your support. we want to deserve a victory. here is the problem. president obama and too many politicians like him in washington, they are more worried about their next election than they are worried about the next generation. [applause] we need leadership. you have mark here. that man is a great leader. send him back to help us fix the mess in washington. we have entrepreneurs in this country that built this country. by the way, john phillips, we are here at your business. you know what? you built this business. [applause] the government does not get the credit for that. you
things that is not a premarket industry in the united states because regardless of whether we have the information as to the optimus and effectiveness of a hospital or a physician problem -- or a physician, our health care provider networks that we are allowed to use are dictated by the insurance companies. a lot of the discussion about health care in the united states, people fail to discuss the role of the insurance companies and in network and out of network providers. i would like for you to comment on a world of our employers and large insurance companies play in directing where we get care. oftentimes, we are not allowed to get hair -- get care at, say, a university hospital or a teaching hospital regardless of our condition since solely because the out of pocket expenses will be way too high for a person to report getting the best care, even though it exists. guest: in my book and "and accountable," i share the reasons why it patient often decides to come to, particular hospital. their mother was treated there, the party was easy. if people are choosing a hospital based on t
to fund programs all over the united states where we wouldn't only improve -- we wouldn't only build things that we need, but improve them. the american society of civil engineers has addressed this issue, mr. speaker. what they have said, 2.3 trillion of infrastructure maintenance needs to be done. i come from the city of minneapolis and in my city, we had a bridge fall into the mississippi river. maintenance in this country is critical. we have bridges that are old and deteriorating all over this country. we have bridges that are in need of repair, roads as well, and we also have other projects that need to be taken care of, in terms of our grid and wastewater treatment, in terms of all types of important infrastructure. but we have not invested. we are relying on things that our grandparents gave us. we are relying on eisenhower-era infrastructure, because we haven't in our age focused on the needs of the american people to have infrastructure bill. just to talk a little bit more about the american jobs act, it would also extend cutting payroll taxes in half for 98% of businesses.
to the flag. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington d.c., september 12, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable kirsten e. gillibrand, a senator from the state of new york, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: madam president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: the senate is now considering the motion to proceed to s. 3547, the veterans job corps act. 70 minutes will be equally divided this morning between the two leaders or their designees with the republicans controlling the first half and the majority controlling the final half. we'll begin consideration of veterans jobs bill today. it's unfortunate that we're having to go through all this, another couple of filibusters on this bill. but th
is suspending joint missions between the united states soldier and afghan soldiers with a growing number of insider attacks. what does this mean for the end of the war? or the war now? we have details from the pentagon. and the attack on diplomatic missions across the middle east putting foreign policy on the campaign trail controversial. the potential impact on the undecided voters coming up. a study suggests letting your kid take the occasional sip of alcohol may really not be the best way to stop your child from becoming a heavy drinker later on. that is all ahead unless breaking news changes everything. this is "studio b." but, first, from fox at 3:00 in new york city, the race if the white house. the republican presidential nominee, mitt romney, is responding today to a video shot in may during a private fundraiser. an attendee secretly recorded and it gave it to the liberal website "mother jones." in the video, he touches on everything from foreign policy to the economy. at one point he calls president obama supporters "people who are dependent upon the government who believe they
. there was no clear consensus about what is the ultimate goal of the united states and europe. is the goal of the one hand or is this just a customs union? it's so dissimilar as many have pointed to the formation of the united states. but here again the idea was let's not try to reach agreement on the end result because there is no consensus but let's take a step at a time and develop the institutions necessary as the problems come up. what wasn't perceived as the context of which the huge decisions would have to be taken was the mother of all financial crises from the united states. so, the pressures are far greater than we are anticipating and the year being forced into making big decisions. we are going to find out if they are willing to make the sacrifices necessary to sustain and. yesterday the peterson institute presented an interesting study of spain and italy whether it was sustainable the conclusion is of the plausible scenarios and the answer is yes. under the circumstances it seemed to me surprising if the project would be abandoned in a sense in that context. >> we and interesting meeting
introduced that topic as a very essential topic of the foreign policy of the united states. it was not theory. it became a reality. and one by one the countries of derision which were not used to elections or not used to democratic governments for many years and decades suddenly one after the other started to become democratic governments. and, of course, after he left the presidency he didn't go home to write memoirs and maybe play some golf. he has a beautiful house, i enjoy to visit you. he decided to be, continue being a big player many -- in supporting the same principles, human rights and democracy. and we see president carter going from one country to another observing elections. he has the ability to have the possibility to talk in friendly, in a friendly way with different actors in the region. i have witnessed that. it could be that maybe some actors are antagonist to the united states. maybe some of the actors do have different views about how the world should function. or different cultures about what democracy is. but president carter has the talent, the ability, the wisdom to in
came across the plaza, senators and their staff streaming down the steps here, the united states senate, not knowing where to go. and that is one of the many frightening, very frightening things, not only did we not know what was happening but there was no place for these incredibly important people to go, no plan at the time. so we came right here, which is across from the capitol, we trd to plug in our camera so they could get a shot of whatever was going to happen or happening here and it was really that the moment, we're talking about minutes here, suzanne, that members of the capitol police corps started screaming, run, run for your life. i believe you were at the white house, to have somebody who is in uniform tell you to run for your life, there's probably nothing more frightening than that. and the reason is because they were hearing in their ear that a plane was missing in the air and of course it was 93 and they didn't know if it was heading for the white house or the capitol or what. so that's why they told us to leave. i want to show you the scene, people were running across
. and i should say this too. the israeli prime minister, before embarking to the united states, made remarks briefly yesterday on the holiest day, right before the holiest day in the jewish calendar, yom kippur. he said this speaking about mahmoud ahmadinejad speaking at the united nations on that very same day. and i quote. on this day when we pray to be inscribed to the book of life a platform was given to a dictatorial regime who tries at every step to sentence us to death. it is position of the israeli prime minister if not stopped iran will developed enriched-uranium that could be used to make a bomb as early as spring of 2013. we expect him to elaborate on that in just the next few moments. megyn. megyn: david lee miller, thank you so. there was, as we've always heard from iran some bellicose language from its leader in the united nations. israel will have the chance to respond after mr. netanyahu speaks, we will be joined live right here for reaction and perspective by general jack keane and ambassador john bolton. don't miss it. busy afternoon. >> the cost of food is up. the
to the protests in a number of countries. let me state very clearly, and i hope it is obvious that the united states government had absolutely nothing to do with this video. we absolutely reject its content and message. america's commitment to religious tolerance goes back to the very beginning of our nation. as you know, we are a place that is home to people of all religions. many come to this country seeking the right to exercise their own religion, including of course millions of muslims. we have the greatest respect for people of faith. to us and to me personally, this video is disgusting and reprehensible. as i said yesterday, there is no justification, none at all, for responding to this video with violence. we condemn the violence that has resulted in the strongest terms. we greatly appreciate that many muslims in the united states and around the world have spoken out on this issue. violence has no place in religion and is no way to honor religion. islam respects the fundamental dignity of human beings. it is a violation of that fundamental dignity to wage attacks on innocents. as long
or iran or turkey invoking the greatness of their own power and impact and the united states tends to be more future oriented but in this particular case you found that the trauma of the hostage crisis and in the iranian revolution is still very formative and the - of americans who are responsible for the iran policy. >> guest: it is. ambassador ryan crocker told me one time in an interview that they are the most historical were the least historical society. and in this case i think there's still certainly every time they have a negotiation including the most recent one in moscow during the whole litany of grievances, so it is always on their mind. whether the u.s. policy makers realize it or not, the are too. the first years after the revolution clearly the hostage issue was for most american policy makers mind. if the iran contra happens that causes the relationship with the next prior risk and we saw it happen to ronald reagan and over a series of instances where they have spurred u.s. efforts to the rapprochement. there's a great example like to give just on this idea of the mo
into the hands of terrorrests that could be used against the united states, and instead cnn went to the scene. so there are so many things that are so troubling, um, that whether it was lying or incompetence, to me, is almost beside the point. megyn: interesting point. >> they need to give us the information about what really happened and are they connecting the dots, are they looking at this and saying, you know, we had some pre-9/11 attacks that we now in hindsight know were, you know, we should have seen as a warning. are you looking at and trying to understand the context of this attack. megyn: and that's why these lawmakers are now seeking to get the actual cables, the communication -- >> that's right. >> megyn: -- between ambassador stevens and the state department so they could see where he was raising -- hold on -- raising the concerns expressed in that journal to his employers employd asked for an increased level of protection. monica, ten seconds, quickly. >> that's right. when the charge of cover up is raised, what are they covering up? why was ambassador stevens going to men gazty si
a second obama term and how the united states -- thanks. >> brief word on that. iran policy is going to be close to the center of this but let me make a more specific answer with the matter todd raised. missile defense. the obama administration would be interested in finding a way to smooth relations with russia over subsequent stages to european missile defense architecture. i don't know if president obama could just give vladimir putin a veto. i also don't think he is going to feel a hypothetical plan for 2018 developed a couple years ago needs to be seen and set in stone where governor romney because of his strong views towards russia would see it as a way to establish in backing off on the campaign trail even if language about russia and the top geostrategic threat was overstated and not something he chose for the convention speech but made it pretty clear in that speech that he does see the need to stand up to russia and european missile defense is an important case in point. the other thing i will mention is on strategic nuclear arms control. of the three people i have been men
by saying god bless you, god bless the united states of america, and god bless the great people of the national guard. thank you so much. [applause] >> governor romney, thank you so much for joining us today. we hope you will continue to make the nation's defense and security a key part of your campaign. as a memento to this occasion, of a like to present you with this special coin of the national guard association of the united states, especially put together for this conference. we give it to you with our gratitude. thank you for being with us. >> thank you, major general. thank you. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] ♪ ♪ ♪ >> president obama is back on the campaign trail this week with visits to nevada and colorado. tomorrow, his other grass-roots campaign event in las vegas. we will be live with the president starting at 8:25 eastern on c-span2. former president bill clinton campaigned for president obama in miami on tuesday, part of it today trip to florida. he campaigned in orlan
international indebtedness. if the united states economy is not as strong as it has been in the past, we cannot protect our values around the globe, and we cannot negotiate with bankers. this gives us serious weaknesses on the economic and national-security front. the ultimate insult, we handed to the next generation that had no safe in the kinds of things we have seen go on and ask them to pick up the bill, and that seems like a gross injustice and mass. gerri: i want you to respond to something, david axelrod, the president's base of riser said about this and why the president is doing the right thing. here he is. >> the president's plan would do what the simpson bowles plan would do, cut the deficit by $4 trillion, reduce attack under our deficits down to 3 percent of the gross domestic product which is what everybody agrees we need to stabilize the debt. then we will be in a position to begin reducing it further. gerri: what do you make of that. >> perfect except for a couple of flaws. we have not seen the growth and are not likely to get the kind of growth that they assume in those budget
of the countries wider fiscal troubles. no doubt the united states faces a serious fiscal predicament that could turn into a crisis of credit, confidence, of our position in the world if not addressed. at some point financial insolvency at home will turn into strategic insolvency abroad. we are not there yet, but the longer the united states government delays in getting with countries long-term fiscal problems, will only make dealing with them later more painful and potentially more risky in terms of national security. we will get a preview of how damaging this scenario could be at the end of december when hundreds of billions of dollars in mindless across the board spending cuts will take effect for 2013. adding up to more than $1.2 trillion in reduced discretionary spending over the next decade. half of that coming from defense. the result would be grave damage to the u.s. military, homeland security, aviation safety, and virtually all other essential government operations. according to most experts, taking so much money out of the u.s. economy so soon and without any strategy, rationality, or
produce all sorts of nuclear missiles getting ahead of the united states in defense in a way that was so dangerous that we might lose the cold war. kennedy said that over and over again. one of the reasons he won election in 1960. he got into office with access to intelligence and realized soviets are way behind, extremely behind the united states. there is a missile gap in favor of the united states so the problem was kennedy and campaign said we need to increase defense in order to make of this problem and he was committed to that. in 1961 the largest defense buildup in human history and the results to a great extent, one of the ways he dealt with that, and a large portion of humanity to death. >> when did crucial of -- >> guest: he was high on solid leadership but when we went to dinner at stalin's, never knew when the car came back whether it would take us home or to the gulag and it did take some people to the gulag but not crucial of. stalin died in 1953. there were two leaders who were essentially joint leadership. khrushchev and malenkov. by 54-55-56, crucial of was the supreme l
. that's important. because that distinguishes him from the united states senate which also has a legal obligation to submit a budget and has refused to do so for the last three years. you wonder why it is we can't come together on funding priorities, madam speaker, three years the senate has said we are not going to tell you what we are interested in doing. we are not going to provide you with any ideas. and because we won't move it, the house product can't move, the president doesn't have anything to work with, and you see the kind of economic turmoil that we are in today. but the president to his credit has submitted a budget each and every year with his priorities. this is the budget he submitted for 2012. this was just last february, the law required it. he complied with it. but he's running for re-election and he's got his fingers on the pulse of the american people, but what they need and what they desire and what they want from the united states government, all tuned towards an election in november anti-budget that he submitted -- and the budget that he submitted raidses taxes a
'm a forecaster, but we, you know, the united states is in this sort of very different position. you might argue japan, somewhat different circumstances, very high domestic savings rate, managed to sort of face a different set of constraints in that environment, but i ultimately agree with vince that, like, you have to deal with this problem, and you can't get around it. but we're operating under somewhat different constraints. >> john? >> yeah. which is everything's fine until it's not fine. but -- >> i didn't say not -- [laughter] >> the point is this time is different. [laughter] >> anyway, of course -- >> don't want to go there, vince? >> with yeah. >> all this precluding vince and ken's study was music to the ears of the folks at the imf who have had this view for some time that this is how these situations have to be, have to be dealt with. but certainly lew is right, everything doesn't have to get fixed today, but it's got to get fixed, and it's been the key, and the key is that it has to be that people have to have confidence that it will be fixed, and that's the tricky part; namely, how
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